WHY AREN'T YOU NICE??

Oct 16

“The CDC hasn’t stopped Ebola yet, so we should just keep cutting their budget until they do.” —

(via teapartycat)

The logic of NCLB, too. Pestilence and ignorance are the costs they are willing to pay to drown government in the bathtub.

(via sethshead)

(via sethshead)

micdotcom:

Chart: How does Ebola compare to other diseases

Information is Beautiful’s David McCandless’ insightful new infographic provides a bird’s-eye view of diseases and infections that have made headlines in recent years, from swine and avian flu to HIV and Middle East respiratory syndrome.
And while Ebola is not quite as infectious as malaria or even chicken pox, it is one of the deadliest diseases that made it onto the graph, sitting at third place behind rabies and HIV.
The Ebola epidemic is getting worse | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

Chart: How does Ebola compare to other diseases

Information is Beautiful’s David McCandless’ insightful new infographic provides a bird’s-eye view of diseases and infections that have made headlines in recent years, from swine and avian flu to HIV and Middle East respiratory syndrome.

And while Ebola is not quite as infectious as malaria or even chicken pox, it is one of the deadliest diseases that made it onto the graph, sitting at third place behind rabies and HIV.

The Ebola epidemic is getting worse | 
Follow micdotcom

(via russalex)

Oct 15

“The subtext of The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, and Last Week Tonight (the best of the three) is that elected and appointed officials belong to a suspect class of people who’ve earned intense skepticism and are better mocked than venerated. Even if the shows go easier on Democrats than Republicans, all three are straightforward proponents of the notion that all politicians are somewhat absurd, base characters, often in over their heads, and willing to shamelessly lie and spin. This is often the truth.” — Why Broadcast Journalism Is Flirting With Jon Stewart

(via azspot)

liberalsarecool:


Precaution is partisan.

liberalsarecool:

Precaution is partisan.

(Source: teabonics-fb, via oinonio)

pubhealth:

Ebola in the U.S.—Politics and Public Health Don’t Mix
By Judy Stone
“Against stupidity, even the gods strive in vain.” — Fredirich Schiller
I’ve been glued to the Ebola news, riding the roller coaster of emotions. While  very impressed with CDC’s director, Dr. Tom Frieden’s, initial press conference (10/2/14), I became infuriated at the subsequent statements from Lisa Monaco, Homeland Security Advisor, and the tragicomedy of the Dallas hospital’s farcical response, prompting this post.
Dr. Frieden was calm, reassuring and authoritative in handling this CDC press conference. He conveyed the critical messages well, “Remember, Ebola does not spread from someone who is not infectious. It does not spread from someone who doesn’t have fever and other symptoms. It’s only someone who is sick with Ebola who can spread the disease.” And he was candid: “It is certainly possible that someone who had contact with this individual, a family member or other individual could develop Ebola in the coming weeks. But there is no doubt in my mind that we will stop it here.” He emphasized basic, proven public health strategies of careful infection control, contact tracing, and isolation.
In contrast, although she acknowledged the possibility of a secondary case, Ms. Monaco appeared less credible as she stated, “I want to emphasize that the United States is prepared to deal with this crisis both at home and in the region. Every Ebola outbreak over the past 40 years has been stopped. We know how to do this and we will do it again.”
While I agree that we have the knowledge, experience, and resources to be able to control Ebola, most of the experts are academicians or practice in relatively well-heeled ivory towers. I have practiced Infectious Diseases and Infection Control for 30+ years, primarily in a number of community hospitals, and offer a different perspective here, based on these experiences.
Administrators vs. Practitioners
Increasingly, decision makers are administrators who are disconnected from the realities of patient care. The latest fad, for example is to design hospitals to look like hotels and be “inviting” to patients, although they are very dysfunctional for delivering patient care, especially problematic in ICUs.
Similarly, when “bioterrorism preparedness” first became the rage, our hospital and health department focused on high tech units and hazmat suits while ignoring basic hygiene. I went ballistic, given that there was no soap nor any paper towels in the public school bathrooms, something the county health commissioner said was “not within their purview.” Gotta have priorities, right?
It is not all that different now. One hospital I am familiar with has Powered Air Purifying respirators (PAPRs), purchased with bioterrorism preparedness grants, but neither stethoscopes nor other dedicated equipment for isolation rooms. So nurses and docs gown up to go in the room of a patient with a “superbug” but take their stethoscopes into the room and then on to other patients, perhaps remembering to wipe it down first.
The problems with controlling Ebola cases in the United States is not that we can’t care for people well, or with good infection control. We absolutely can. But the Dallas case abundantly illustrates some of the problems in caring for anyone with a communicable illness, whether a antibiotic resistant organism (aka “superbug) like carbapenem resistant enterobacter (CRE), measles or Ebola.
(More from Scientific American)

pubhealth:

Ebola in the U.S.—Politics and Public Health Don’t Mix

By Judy Stone

“Against stupidity, even the gods strive in vain.” — Fredirich Schiller

I’ve been glued to the Ebola news, riding the roller coaster of emotions. While  very impressed with CDC’s director, Dr. Tom Frieden’s, initial press conference (10/2/14), I became infuriated at the subsequent statements from Lisa Monaco, Homeland Security Advisor, and the tragicomedy of the Dallas hospital’s farcical response, prompting this post.

Dr. Frieden was calm, reassuring and authoritative in handling this CDC press conference. He conveyed the critical messages well, “Remember, Ebola does not spread from someone who is not infectious. It does not spread from someone who doesn’t have fever and other symptoms. It’s only someone who is sick with Ebola who can spread the disease.” And he was candid: “It is certainly possible that someone who had contact with this individual, a family member or other individual could develop Ebola in the coming weeks. But there is no doubt in my mind that we will stop it here.” He emphasized basic, proven public health strategies of careful infection control, contact tracing, and isolation.

In contrast, although she acknowledged the possibility of a secondary case, Ms. Monaco appeared less credible as she stated, “I want to emphasize that the United States is prepared to deal with this crisis both at home and in the region. Every Ebola outbreak over the past 40 years has been stopped. We know how to do this and we will do it again.”

While I agree that we have the knowledge, experience, and resources to be able to control Ebola, most of the experts are academicians or practice in relatively well-heeled ivory towers. I have practiced Infectious Diseases and Infection Control for 30+ years, primarily in a number of community hospitals, and offer a different perspective here, based on these experiences.

Administrators vs. Practitioners

Increasingly, decision makers are administrators who are disconnected from the realities of patient care. The latest fad, for example is to design hospitals to look like hotels and be “inviting” to patients, although they are very dysfunctional for delivering patient care, especially problematic in ICUs.

Similarly, when “bioterrorism preparedness” first became the rage, our hospital and health department focused on high tech units and hazmat suits while ignoring basic hygiene. I went ballistic, given that there was no soap nor any paper towels in the public school bathrooms, something the county health commissioner said was “not within their purview.” Gotta have priorities, right?

It is not all that different now. One hospital I am familiar with has Powered Air Purifying respirators (PAPRs), purchased with bioterrorism preparedness grants, but neither stethoscopes nor other dedicated equipment for isolation rooms. So nurses and docs gown up to go in the room of a patient with a “superbug” but take their stethoscopes into the room and then on to other patients, perhaps remembering to wipe it down first.

The problems with controlling Ebola cases in the United States is not that we can’t care for people well, or with good infection control. We absolutely can. But the Dallas case abundantly illustrates some of the problems in caring for anyone with a communicable illness, whether a antibiotic resistant organism (aka “superbug) like carbapenem resistant enterobacter (CRE), measles or Ebola.

(More from Scientific American)

Department of Defense: 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap -

(Source: climateadaptation, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Tea Party Militia Group Threatens to Arrest Democrats at Polling Places! -

(Source: spillboy)

theeconomist:

Bridges or walls: A panicky response in the West may worsen conditions in west Africa

theeconomist:

Bridges or walls: A panicky response in the West may worsen conditions in west Africa

Google+ Is Dying -

(Source: azspot)

Anonymous said: You're right, most criminals are right. Now if only, as a NATION, most of the people in our prisons were white. Maybe then, background checks wouldn't be discriminatory.

iammyfather:

Maybe if we all were saints, we wouldn’t need supervision.  Until then we need laws and rules.  That includes gun OWNERSHIP backgrond checks.

questionall:


Share if you want a 28th amendment to get money out of politics. Tell your senators that you support the constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. Thanks to Being Liberal.

questionall:

Share if you want a 28th amendment to get money out of politics. Tell your senators that you support the constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. Thanks to Being Liberal.

(via iammyfather)

liberalsarecool:


Tea-bola fever strikes US conservatives.

liberalsarecool:

Tea-bola fever strikes US conservatives.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

The Coming Global Recession and the Remaking of the World -

Demand for actual workers has been kept low while profits and gains from bubbles have been kept high, leading to massive cyclical gains for the rich. The late Jane Jacobs worried (a little early, but presciently) that we were moving into an old-style world. She got the details wrong, but she got the essence correct: as many have observed in the decades since, the plan is aristocracy, and the plan is succeeding. There is aristocracy by right (billionaires) and there is aristocracy by position (corporate officers), and there are important retainers and local gentry (centi-millionaires), but the well-being of the majority of the population is not a concern.

(Source: azspot)

poliscrutiny101:


Fact:The confederation of the original thirteen colonies into one republic was influenced by the Iroquois Confederacy
The U.S. Senate even passed a resolution in 1987 finally acknowledging that.

poliscrutiny101:

Fact:The confederation of the original thirteen colonies into one republic was influenced by the Iroquois Confederacy

The U.S. Senate even passed a resolution in 1987 finally acknowledging that.

(via iammyfather)

i-am-dallas said: I really don't know much about common core, so I can't voice an opinion. But I am aware that the government has a vested interest in teaching revisionist history and pushing political correctness through education. But, after the shenanigans in Texas with the book writers intentionally changing the information to suit their neo-con views, I am not at all surprised to find that children are the butt end of a political agenda by liberals and conservatives. Both parties are a disaster on education.

rightsideofpolitics:

i-am-dallas:

rightsideofpolitics:

I’m against indoctrinating children in school right or left but let me tell you it’s almost always left.
Please provide the story where the school promoted a conservative agenda.

Well if you haven’t heard of southern schools trying to sneak in Christian beliefs into the science class, then you really need to hit up a search engine because there is just so much out there on this topic, sharing just one with you on this very divided topic would not be fair and would probably come loaded with heavy bias due to a lacking of raw source information without bias.

But as far as Texas trying to rewrite the history books, yeah you can find a source for that here, here, here. There are plenty more.

More importantly, this conversation is originally from an image castrating liberals for poor education curriculum and nothing was said about bipartisan views until I pointed out the republican invention of “No Child Left Behind”, and now suddenly “It doesn’t matter if it’s liberal or conservative, left or right”, which is awfully convenient to bring up after the fact gets brought up that conservatives can also be criticized for the exact same thing. Where was this unbiased view prior to my comment? Yeah….. CROCODILE TEARS.

Let’s first address this, christianity is the right thing conservative ideology.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/159548/identify-christian.aspx


Was our founding fathers influenced by Judeo Christianity?

http://acheritagegroup.org/blog/?p=340


http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel04.html

https://www.ewtn.com/library/HUMANITY/RELFREED.TXT


Texas has a right under the 10th Amendment to add the influence of religion in there text.
Again I don’t believe christianity is a right wing ideology.

Remember what I said?
states should handle education, sometimes you have to vote with your feet.

http://rightsideofpolitics.tumblr.com/post/99998357532/i-am-dallas-right-because-no-child-left

Another Note Worth mentioning the graft on the post is from 1970 till 2012.

Your one example is from 2014.

I don’t know what it means but crocodile tears but back at you.

You have a great night and God Bless.
Wayne

There are left and right wing christians and jews, and muslims. What you think Texas ad other States have a right to do is misguided at best. Let’s start by noting that our nation was not founded by Christians nor are we a Christian Nation, We may be a nation with a large Christian population but even that is not relevant as our Constitution makes no reference to the Bible or Christianity. Religion is called out so Government does not give preference to one Religion over another.

Religious teachings that contradict proven science have no place in public education. I want my tax dollars spent on un-biased science. I want the children to learn how to critically think and thrive in an environment that is conducive to asking questions, and learning. There is no questioning God is there? But you know what you can do if you want to have religion in your child’s life? Bring them to the religious institution of your choosing, Temple, Church, Synagogue and I promise you I won’t come to that place and teach science.